New London County Historical Society, Inc.

11 Blinman Street, New London, CT 06320

Phone: 860-443-1209

3004, 2010

Governor Rell Proclaims Shaw Mansion Day

By |April 30th, 2010|Events Blog|Comments Off on Governor Rell Proclaims Shaw Mansion Day

Governor Rell proclaimed 30 April 2010 to be Shaw Mansion Day in the State of Connecticut and Congressman Joe Courtney dropped by to cut the ribbon as the New London County Historical Society celebrated the completion of a $60,000 project to add an accessible classroom and bathroom to the Shaw Mansion.

The project was made possible by support from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, the Community Foundation of Southeastern Connecticut, the Frank Loomis Palmer Fund administered by the Bank of America, and a matching grant from the State of Connecticut’s Historic Preservation Funds, administered by the Commission on Culture and Tourism.

New London County Historical Society President Deborah Donovan spoke of the difficulty of making some of our historic treasures accessible to individuals who have mobility problems and praised the State for their assistance. Rick Gipstein of Lindsay Liebig Roche Architects was the consulting architect on the project, and the contractor was LaBossiere builders of Norwich.

2004, 2010

Ribbon-cutting for Accessible Bathroom

By |April 20th, 2010|Events Blog|Comments Off on Ribbon-cutting for Accessible Bathroom

Friday 30 April, the New London County Historical Society will celebrate the completion of a $60,000 construction project to add an accessible bathroom and classroom to the 1845 wing of the Shaw Mansion. A reception will be held from 4:30pm to 6pm with the ribbon-cutting slated for 5:15.

The project was supported by grants from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, the Community Foundation of Southeastern Connecticut, The Frank Loomis Palmer Fund administered by the Bank of America, and through a matching grant from the State of Connecticut’s Community Investment Act, Historic Preservation Funds, administered through the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism.

Consulting architect for the project was Rick Gipstein of Lindsay Liebig Roche Architects of New London, and the contractor was LaBossiere Builders of Norwich. Short-term funding assistance was obtained through the Southeastern Connecticut Enterprise Region (seCTer).

The project has transformed what was once the 19th century servant’s hall and  kitchen, and a small lavatory stuffed into a closet in the 1970s, into a large classroom and commodious bathroom which meets ADA guidelines. The entire first floor of the historic house is now accessible to visitors, with the bathroom accessible from both the inside and outside of the building. This will […]

1004, 2010

This Treasure Matters

By |April 10th, 2010|Events Blog|Comments Off on This Treasure Matters

“Pride and Prejudice” cast members at the Shaw Mansion participated in a campaign of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Faced with budget cuts eliminating Preserve America grant program, the National Trust has asked historic sites from around the country to send in their photos with the message that THIS TREASURE MATTERS. Between shows on Saturday, the cast were only too happy to pose for the photos that were submitted to the National Trust. See the photo slide show at http://www.preservationnation.org/take-action/this-place-matters/TPM-slideshow.html Mr. Darcy, portrayed by Daniel Dykes, and Jane Bennett, portrayed by Julie Rattey, share the message for the New London County Historical Society.

204, 2010

State Historian Walter Woodward to Speak at April Second Sunday

By |April 2nd, 2010|Events Blog|Comments Off on State Historian Walter Woodward to Speak at April Second Sunday

“New England’s Other Witch Hunt:  The Hartford Witch Hunt of the 1660s and the Changing Patterns of Prosecution.”

Walter Woodward, Connecticut’s State Historian, will be making a presentation based on his just published book, Prospero’s America: John Winthrop, Jr., Alchemy, and the Creation of New England Culture, 1606-1676. The presentation will take place on the Connecticut College Campus in Blaustein 210, on 11 April at 2pm, in a program co-sponsored by the Connecticut College history department and the New London County Historical Society.

The book is full of provocative insights. While some are familiar with alchemy, the common knowledge is usually limited to the idea that alchemy was a magical quest to turn lead into gold. Woodward leads us to understand how alchemy was much more than that, “an important contributing factor in the development of modern chemistry and experimental science.” In this work Woodward shows how Winthrop’s alchemical knowledge, and connections emanating from his participation in the Royal Society, empowered him locally, as a favored Connecticut governor, and at the Royal Court in England.

Combining religion, metallurgy, healing, an entrepreneurial spirit and political will, Woodward is able to enlighten the reader with how those elements intertwine. Winthrop’s efforts to found a NEW London […]